Turbines must be in suitable location

PUBLISHED: 11:52 01 May 2008 | UPDATED: 15:45 11 May 2010

PEOPLE S views on the proposed wind turbines in Litlington are obviously going to be divided. While I am completely in favour of alternative forms of energy, and wind turbines are obviously an effective way of generating energy, they must be situated in

PEOPLE'S views on the proposed wind turbines in Litlington are obviously going to be divided.

While I am completely in favour of alternative forms of energy, and wind turbines are obviously an effective way of generating energy, they must be situated in a suitable location, for example isolated coastal areas or remote mountainous locations.

Placing four turbines of 125-130 metres in height with a 90m diameter, and only about 750 metres from the nearest houses in Litlington is completely ludicrous.

To give an idea of scale, these turbines will be almost equal in height to the London Eye.

I doubt that the residents of these houses will feel the word "majestic" quite sums up these massive industrial structures.

Then, of course, there is the noise that will be emitted from the turbines. The sound the propellers make as they circulate sounds a bit like the drum of a washing machine whirling and can potentially be heard 2 km away - to have to live with that sound is both unfair and unreasonable. Another issue is that Therfield Heath is a Site of Special Scientific Interest and is a local nature reserve, home to a whole host of rare flowers, butterflies and birds, including the redwing and fieldfare.

In addition, Wimpole Hall is home to the Barbastelle bat, a rare species. Only 10 sites are known in Britain. These bats go foraging at night up to a distance of 10 km. These proposed turbines could destroy this delicate bat community and would have a significant impact on the birds and butterflies that are an integral part of the heath and the surrounding countryside.

Placing turbines of this size next to a village and within an area of special interest does not make logical sense and would appear to be motivated by profit alone.

J SMITH

Steeple Morden

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