Time to spring into action

PUBLISHED: 12:55 26 January 2006 | UPDATED: 17:11 11 May 2010

Crocuses

Crocuses

THE year has turned and as daylight lengthens there are signs of the coming of spring in my garden. The snowdrops planted in groups beneath trees in the lawn and along the edge of the drive are in bud showing gleams of white against the green of the gras

Snowdrops

THE year has turned and as daylight lengthens there are signs of the coming of spring in my garden. The snowdrops planted in groups beneath trees in the lawn and along the edge of the drive are in bud showing gleams of white against the green of the grass. Thanks to lower temperatures this winter they are set to flower at the right time in February instead of earlier, which has been the case in the recent very mild run of winters. Early last year I created a new shrub bed next to my pond which I filled with Cornus Winter Fire, a variety producing bark shading from yellow to red for interesting winter colour. In the autumn, I decided to add some white flowered crocus bulbs and snowdrops which were planted in their dry form. Both types of bulb are coming through the soil now, but while the crocus looks likely to bloom well at least half of the snowdrops are clearly only producing leaves without flowers. This experience underlines the fact that snowdrops are best planted in the green, that is when they still have their leaves but after their flowers have faded. There are a number of nurseries which offer a mail order service selling snowdrops in the green towards the end of February and in the past when I have bought from them I have found that the bulbs have flowered very well the following year. Now I have such a large collection of snowdrops in my garden that I can afford to split the clumps after flowering and plant these in fresh areas which they can colonise instead of buying in. However, when I planted the bed of Cornus last year I did not think about under-planting with snowdrops until it was too late to use plants in the green. Although the dry bulbs are a disappointment in their first year they will be fine in future years and soon form healthy splashes of white and green to contrast with the red and yellow stems of the Cornus.

0 comments

More news stories

12:39

Officers from the Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire and Hertfordshire Road Policing Unit (BCH RPU) now have the power to seize vehicles that have been untaxed for longer than eight weeks.

Police in the Fens released a tally of hare coursing and related offences from the past two months that include four arrests and 17 vehicles seized.

08:53

New locations for services and Christmas-themed activities have been announced for Royston’s parish church after the devastating fire at the weekend.

07:01

Christmas has arrived in Ashwell, as hundreds of visitors enjoyed the village’s annual festive celebration.

Most read stories

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists

Digital Edition

Image
Read the Royston Crow e-edition E-edition

Newsletter Sign Up

Royston Crow weekly newsletter
Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter

Our Privacy Policy