There is the right to object over any compulsory purchase order

PUBLISHED: 19:12 18 June 2008 | UPDATED: 15:47 11 May 2010

I NOTE that the underpass is back in the news again. I find the statement that the public will be consulted again over plans for the underpass a little odd, taking into account that the persons most adversely affected by the crossing were just told it wou

I NOTE that the underpass is back in the news again.

I find the statement that the public will be consulted again over plans for the underpass a little odd, taking into account that the persons most adversely affected by the crossing were just told it would be located at Coombes Hole .

It is interesting to see that the prickly issue of rights of way is coming to the fore, presumably it is not as straightforward a matter as some people first thought, and I find it no surprise that the final solution may well be compulsory purchase.

With regards to the residents of Brooke Road, whose properties border this development, this will equate to a legalised removal (some may say theft) of large sections of their rear garden.

Fortunately, affected parties are allowed to object to the purchase which could then well lead to a public inquiry meaning further delay and increased costs.

It is stated that any plans for the underpass would include the the provision of adequate lighting and installation of closed-circuit television cameras in a "bid" to overcome any security issues.

CCTV is only helpful if it is continually monitored and a rapid response actually occurs in the event of an incident .

Looking on the positive side once the planning application has been submitted any affected parties can submit written objection to this, which may well lead to a further inquiry, more delays and increased cost.

NIGEL SEYMOUR

Brooke Road

Royston

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