Report from the Front: The Great War diary of Jack Halstead

PUBLISHED: 18:33 14 May 2008 | UPDATED: 15:46 11 May 2010

Still on sap. This was deep enough now for shelter, but I did not like them. I once saw men digging their pals out. The mouth of the sap had been blown in, 10 men had been buried alive and were dead before they could be reached. During the night shoot,

Still on sap. This was deep enough now for shelter, but I did not like them. I once saw men digging their pals out. The mouth of the sap had been blown in, 10 men had been buried alive and were dead before they could be reached.

During the night shoot, put the wind up an infantry platoon returning from the line. They would make a track in front of our guns. We saw that they were safe and opened fire. They were then a few yards to the left of muzzle.

- May 17, 1918.

Great news. Brigade being relieved, 14 days rest. Coldstream Band playing in the village.

- May 20, 1918.

Twelve horses killed and nine wounded. One tent had its pole cut through 12in from the ground: cut as clean as though with a saw.

Not a thankful job cleaning up the mess in the horse lines.

- May 24, 1918.


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