Report from the Front: The Great War diary of Jack Halstead

PUBLISHED: 19:37 07 May 2008 | UPDATED: 15:45 11 May 2010

At daybreak enemy observation planes were busy. They would fly at a very low altitude. Those who were standing to were always waiting for them. Would get busy with the Lewis guns. All batteries in the vicinity would be at the same occupation. Although non

At daybreak enemy observation planes were busy. They would fly at a very low altitude. Those who were standing to were always waiting for them. Would get busy with the Lewis guns.

All batteries in the vicinity would be at the same occupation.

Although none were shot down, they did not get much of an opportunity to look around.

- May 9, 1918.

We had a trip out to "purple line trench". Open country and we could look down on the German line.

- May 10, 1918.

We had received news that the Royal Engineers had been digging out mining sets. These were found in a stack in front of the "purple line". One by one, we carried them and hid them under a bridge. On several occasions we had to seek shelter.

- May 12, 1918.


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Royston Crow. Click the link in the yellow box below for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years, through good times and bad, serving as your advocate and trusted source of local information. Our industry is facing testing times, which is why I’m asking for your support. Every single contribution will help us continue to produce award-winning local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Thank you.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Royston Crow