Editor-at-large: Finding the clues

PUBLISHED: 12:04 10 April 2008 | UPDATED: 15:43 11 May 2010

IT'S been one of those weeks again when things (there is no other description) have been cleared out. Or perhaps I should say they ve been moved around and placed in a more orderly order. It will not last for long, but for the time being, certain things

IT'S been one of those weeks again when things (there is no other description) have been cleared out.

Or perhaps I should say they've been moved around and placed in a more orderly order.

It will not last for long, but for the time being, certain things are actually in the right place.

The clearing out operation involved getting to grips with the contents of a desk drawer.

You may say there is nothing as simple as clearing out a drawer. After all, it's not too long and it's not too deep so the contents should not be too difficult to, shall we say, re-arrange.

I did say re-arrange. There's nothing that is kept in a desk for years that should be thrown away, because the time will come when that certain item could prove to be invaluable.

That's not to say, however, that there is anything valuable virtually dumped in the desk drawer.

But it does contain a curious collection of bric-a-brac.

To begin with there is an edition of Picture Post (we of a certain age remember Picture Post) which was purchased in some second-hand shop years ago. It is, however, the Christmas edition of 1947, which means we share the same age.

And it does contain a piece of writing by Dylan Thomas which, it has to be said, is a good enough reason as any for keeping the tattered publication.

Then there are the instruction books to machines and the odd radio, and an ancient computer (isn't a computer ancient in about a week?) which have been stockpiled during the years.

There is no reason to keep them because all the machines and what have you have long since disappeared.

And obviously, there is a collection of old birthday cards and photographs and cards requesting the pleasure of my company, and business cards from jobs in the past.

There are the empty wallets and even a Filofax (remember the day?).

This is just the contents of one drawer.

But it is said that from simply looking through the contents of someone's desk drawer, a picture will emerge of that person.

Maybe.

But I know the second desk drawer may contain as much clutter, but it is totally different, so the exercise of deduction in true Sherlock Holmes style doesn't actually work.

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