Best days of your life

PUBLISHED: 13:28 19 July 2007 | UPDATED: 15:10 12 May 2010

IT S that time of year when school careers come to an end and students, as we were always told, take the journey into the wide world. Years later, we are told again, schooldays were the best years of our life. Perhaps they were. They were so long ago now

IT'S that time of year when school careers come to an end and students, as we were always told, take the journey into the wide world.

Years later, we are told again, schooldays were the best years of our life.

Perhaps they were.

They were so long ago now - and not being someone who has an army of ex-schooldays colleagues contacting me on Friends Reunited - that the details are difficult to remember.

Indeed, it's only when others begin recalling their schooldays that I begin to realise that there were some moments the can still be remembered.

None of them, I add, has anything to do with academic achievement.

Indeed, the last school report I received said: "Could do better, but not here."

That would give anyone confidence for the future, although over the years, whoever made such a comment has probably been proved to be right.

They're a clever lot these teachers.

I still believe there was an outpouring of great relief when we left school.

This was, after all, in the 1960s, and we were the class of youth rebellion and long hair and proper pop music.

We were seen as "difficult".

All right, we had demolished the science lab with one experiment, created an exclusive smoking club behind the bike sheds and once managed to get a set of netball posts on the school roof.

But difficult?

Isn't that all part of growing up?

Really, it was displaying initiative in which the school should have been proud. It was showing we could be creative and exercise our minds.

And obviously it took our minds away from lessons.

Although it had to be said, our lessons were not too bad. There were the occasions when we persuaded our maths teacher to talk about his exploits in the Second World War rather than concentrate on algebra, or the English teacher who thought studying the Daily Sketch and Daily Mirror gave us a better understanding of literature than Shakespeare, or the biology teacher who became rather upset when we released his experimental mice into the wild.

That's what schooldays were all about and those are the kind of memories that remain years after.

Although, it has to be said, we did actually learn something.

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