What the Romans did for museum

PUBLISHED: 13:42 03 May 2007 | UPDATED: 15:05 12 May 2010

Curator Peter Greener with the replica plaque

Curator Peter Greener with the replica plaque

THE British Museum visited Ashwell to present a unique replica plaque to the village museum. In 2002, a hoard of Roman treasure was discovered in an Ashwell field, containing 27 gold and silver objects, and a variety of jewellery. There were also a numb

THE British Museum visited Ashwell to present a unique replica plaque to the village museum.

In 2002, a hoard of Roman treasure was discovered in an Ashwell field, containing 27 gold and silver objects, and a variety of jewellery.

There were also a number of votive leaf plaques found, many of which had inscriptions of the previously unknown goddess Senuna. The find was believed to have been buried in the later third or fourth century AD.

After being declared as treasure, the hoard was purchased by the British Museum, where it will soon be on display.

To commemorate the find, the curator of the Romano-British collections, Dr Ralph Jackson, presented a replica votive plaque to the village museum.

Curator Peter Greener, pictured above with the replica plaque, said: "It was an honour to have the British Museum present in Ashwell.

"It is extremely rare for them to make such a gift, but it shows how important they feel the discovery has been."

Dr Jackson and other British Museum representatives gave a talk to residents and guests and underlined the importance of the hoard and its international significance.

Mr Greener said: "It's obviously an important find for us, but what people don't realise is the fact this was also a great find for the world.

"It was good to see so many people at the museum."

Mr Greener said the find helped expand knowledge of the Roman influence of the village, and believes that somewhere in the Ashwell area is a buried temple.

"The next discovery could well be a Roman temple. I believe it's buried here somewhere.

"It was a fantastic night and we have been given something very special. And there's not too many villages that can say they have their own goddess!"

- The replica votive plaque can be seen in the village museum in Swan Street, where the display explains more about the find and its discoveries, as well as revealing its hidden secrets.

- For opening times call 01462 742956.

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