We're going plane crazy

PUBLISHED: 13:31 06 August 2009 | UPDATED: 16:06 11 May 2010

NOISE caused by aerobatic planes preparing for a world championship is making the life of people across Crow Country a misery. Pilots have been taking to the skies over Royston in their droves in the last few weeks, as they gear up for the World Aerobatic

NOISE caused by aerobatic planes preparing for a world championship is making the life of people across Crow Country a misery.

Pilots have been taking to the skies over Royston in their droves in the last few weeks, as they gear up for the World Aerobatic Championships, which begin at Silverstone on August 19.

But the noise created by their planes has infuriated residents of surrounding villages.

Peter Shuttlewood, of Sunny Mead Orchard, Ashwell, said: "The noise is completely annoying and monotonous.

"You go out into your garden and all hell breaks loose. They keep going up, down, round, and looping the loop."

Mr Shuttlewood added that many of his neighbours are also getting irked by the presence of the aircraft.

"We're used to the big planes going over, but these ones make a lot more noise, and we're seeing them two or three times a day now," he said.

Tina Foulser, of Pedlars Lane, Therfield, has also been affected.

She said: "It's awful really, it's been going on every day for two or three weeks and we don't get a break. If only they could lay off for a couple of days."

In recent weeks The Crow has also been contacted by people from Bassingbourn and Royston complaining about the noise.

Aerobatic pilot Mark Jeffries, whose company, Yak UK, is based at Little Gransden airfield, said that he has not been going up for more flights than usual, but that pilots from other airfields were coming to fly in this area.

He said: "The Stansted airport flying zone, which restricts aircraft movements, ends near Royston, so pilots from Essex airfields are flying this way so they can get some practice in.

"I have spoken to several and asked them to fly in daytime during the week."

Mr Jeffries said it was a "great honour" that the UK had been chosen to host the world championship for the first time in 23 years.

"Eighty per cent of people in this country fly on commercial aircraft, and a lot of the big airline pilots do aerobatics in their spare time. It's their way of relaxing," he said.

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