Six firms in Royston area require major improvement as food hygiene ratings in North Herts revealed

PUBLISHED: 08:31 16 July 2015 | UPDATED: 09:56 16 July 2015

The latest food hygiene ratings have been revealed. Photo: Getty Images/iStockphoto

The latest food hygiene ratings have been revealed. Photo: Getty Images/iStockphoto

Archant

Six businesses in the Royston area are listed as requiring major improvements to meet acceptable food hygiene standards, a Crow investigation has revealed.

The ratings explained

5 – Very good

4 – Good

3 – Generally satisfactory

2 – Improvement necessary

1 – Major improvement necessary

0 – Urgent improvement necessary

Officers inspect how hygienically food is prepared, cooked, reheated, cooled and stored.

They also check the cleanliness, layout, lighting and ventilation of the building and that there are systems in place to make sure food is safe for consumption.

A study of more than 150 inspections carried out by North Herts District Council since the start of the year has found that, while more than half received the highest score possible, dozens of eateries were rated as below par.

Across the district 19 per cent of the places inspected were classed as ‘non-compliant’, which means they scored a rating of two or fewer out of five.

Among them were three Royston firms and three further businesses from North Herts villages nearby which all received a one star rating – the second lowest available.

Mughal Kitchen in the town’s Kneesworth Street received one star when inspected in February, but manager Abdul Jaffar said there had been a change in ownership since and that the Indian takeaway was due to undergo a reinspection by district council officers.

How they ranked in North Herts

0 – Less than one per cent

One star - 12 per cent

Two stars - Seven per cent

Three stars - Six per cent

Four stars - 17 per cent

Five stars - 58 per cent

Total: 156, four star average

Fast food takeaway Golden Sun in Burns Road was given the top rating – a five – and manager Sang Wong said: “The ratings are generally good for small businesses, but it can be hard for those that struggle with English who do not understand the procedures.”

Five years ago, the Food Standards Agency introduced a nationally standardised rating scheme – from zero to five stars – and took the step of not only publishing the rating, but the report as well.

Hygiene bosses say this has generally reduced the number of places failing to meet standards, but our figures suggest there is more work to do.

Councillor Bernard Lovewell, responsible for environmental health at North Herts District Council, said: “The council has been operating the National Food Hygiene Rating Scheme for two years and has been targeting resources on some of the poorer performing businesses to help them to improve their standards.

“We are really encouraged that currently only one premise has a zero rating and the broad compliance – three, four and five ratings – increased to 87.1 per cent between April 2014 and March 2015 from 80.7 per cent in 2013/14.

“Another focus has been to address the number of premises which didn’t have a rating and, as of the end of March this year, more than 95 per cent of businesses have now been rated. We have also achieved 100 per cent of scheduled food safety inspections.”

Unfortunately our interactive map may not work on mobile devices. Click on the link below to view the map in a new window.

Click here for North Herts food hygiene ratings.

l Statistics for South Cambs District Council will be published next week.

 

North Herts ratings map