Prince pays tribute to Airborne Forces

PUBLISHED: 10:29 11 December 2008 | UPDATED: 15:56 11 May 2010

Airborne soldiers who fought in conflicts from Normandy and Arnhem in 1944 to Afghanistan in 2008 attended the opening of Airborne Assault, the new museum of The Parachute Regiment and Airborne Forces at Imperial War Museum Duxford. Airborne Assault tells the story of men who have gone to war from the air since 1940 and continue to do so today.
The new museum was formally opened by HRH The Prince of Wales, Colonel-in-Chief, The Parachute Regiment today.
Among those attending were be soldiers recently returned from operations in Helmand, Afghanistan where The Parachute Regiment and its essential airborne elements of artillery, engineers, signallers and logistics has seen some of the fiercest fighting since World War 2. Also attending were veterans from key actions in Normandy and Arnhem during World War 2 where Airborne Forces served with distinction.

HRH The Prince of Wales makes his speech and shows the crowed the aircraft he learned to fly in.

Airborne soldiers who fought in conflicts from Normandy and Arnhem in 1944 to Afghanistan in 2008 attended the opening of Airborne Assault, the new museum of The Parachute Regiment and Airborne Forces at Imperial War Museum Duxford. Airborne Assault tells the story of men who have gone to war from the air since 1940 and continue to do so today. The new museum was formally opened by HRH The Prince of Wales, Colonel-in-Chief, The Parachute Regiment today. Among those attending were be soldiers recently returned from operations in Helmand, Afghanistan where The Parachute Regiment and its essential airborne elements of artillery, engineers, signallers and logistics has seen some of the fiercest fighting since World War 2. Also attending were veterans from key actions in Normandy and Arnhem during World War 2 where Airborne Forces served with distinction. HRH The Prince of Wales makes his speech and shows the crowed the aircraft he learned to fly in.

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THE PRINCE of Wales was in Duxford on Monday to open a new addition to the Imperial War Museum. Airborne Assault is the new museum of The Parachute Regiment and Airborne Forces, and tells the story of men who have gone to war from the air since 1940, and

THE PRINCE of Wales was in Duxford on Monday to open a new addition to the Imperial War Museum.

Airborne Assault is the new museum of The Parachute Regiment and Airborne Forces, and tells the story of men who have gone to war from the air since 1940, and continue to do so today.

Prince Charles was invited to open the museum as he is Colonel-in-Chief of the Parachute Regiment.

General Sir Mike Jackson, President of the Airborne Assault Appeal said: "This is much more than a museum."

"We are honouring here the spirit of the brave men and women who go to war from the air.

"Airborne Forces were to the fore at Normandy, Arnhem, the Falklands, Kosovo, and Iraq, and now in Afghanistan.

"Our vision is that the spirit of Airborne Forces which has been passed between generations since 1940 will be brought alive at this world-class venue."

Among those attending were veterans from key actions in Normandy and Arnhem during the Second World War, where Airborne Forces served with distinction.

They include Private Peter Jordan, 88, a gunner with 211 Battery 53rd Airlanding Light Regiment Royal Artillery, who landed by glider in Normandy on D-Day at the age of 24, and fought throughout the first months of the Allied invasion.

Also present were soldiers recently returned from operations in Helmand, Afghanistan, where The Parachute Regiment has seen some of the fiercest fighting since the Second World War.

Air Chief Marshal Sir Peter Squire, Chairman of the Imperial War Museum, said: "The men of The Parachute Regiment and Airborne Forces have set an outstanding example throughout their history.

"Their values are relevant today in society at large, not just in the military.


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