Police chiefs are recognised

PUBLISHED: 13:32 22 June 2006 | UPDATED: 14:44 12 May 2010

Julie Spence

Julie Spence

JULIE Spence, who became chief constable of Cambridgeshire police last December, has received an OBE in the Queen s Birthday Honours. The award was said to mark her considerable experience in managing complex policing issues and the role she played in dri

Frank Whiteley

JULIE Spence, who became chief constable of Cambridgeshire police last December, has received an OBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours.

The award was said to mark her considerable experience in managing complex policing issues and the role she played in driving forward the agenda for women in policing.

The 50-year-old chief constable previously worked for Thames Valley police and Somerset police.

At Thames Valley she was involved in leading an operation to protect Heathrow airport with colleagues from the Metropolitan Police and Surrey police.

And she was praised for her handing of the Thames Valley policing operation at the Queen Mother's funeral.

She left Thames Valley as assistant chief constable to become deputy chief constable in Cambridgeshire in 2004.

Her career has included working with the Association of Chief Police Officers on anti-terrorism issues.

Mrs Spence said: "I am particularly pleased that the work I have done to advance British policing and the role of women in policing has been recognised in this way."

Michael Williamson, chairman of the Cambridgeshire Police Authority, said his body was "exceptionally proud" of Mrs Spence's achievement.

"Her contribution to policing in Cambridgeshire is well documented and in the national arena she has demonstrated that she is top of her class on gender issues in today's police service," he said.

n Frank Whiteley, the chief constable of Herts, has received the Queen's Police Medal (QPM) in the Birthday's Honours list.

He said, however: "Policing is all about team work and partnership and I would see this award more appropriately as recognition of the work of the many colleagues who have assisted me."

Mr Whiteley joined Herts police as chief constable in October, 2004 after being deputy chief constable of Northamptonshire police.

While at Northamptonshire he led on the high profile arrangements for the burial of Princess Diana, the Princess of Wales, in 1997.

He is currently the Association of Chief Police Officers' national lead officer on the workings of Neighbourhood Watch schemes.

Ian Laidlaw-Dickson, chairman of the Herts Police Authority, said the award to Mr Whiteley was "well-deserved".

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