Plans for 220 Barrington homes draws criticism from villagers

PUBLISHED: 16:49 17 December 2014 | UPDATED: 16:51 17 December 2014

Barrington cement plant was decomissioned in 2012

Barrington cement plant was decomissioned in 2012

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Plans to build up to 220 homes in Barrington has drawn widespread criticism from villagers.

Barrington Parish Council held meetings on Friday night and Saturday morning to discuss building materials giant CEMEX’s proposal to redevelop its factory at Barrington quarry into housing.

Of the hundreds attending the meeting, 92 per cent raised their hand in objection to the plans.

The proposals include 40 per cent affordable housing, open spaces, play areas and allotments, as well as the construction of a cycle and footpath on the old railway line to link up with Foxton railway station.

A spokesman for Barrington Parish Council said: “The parish council has raised serious concerns regarding the proposal and maintains the view that this is not sustainable.

“There would be a 47 per cent increase in the number of properties in the village and an estimated 83 per cent increase in the number of voters!

“Profound concerns were expressed at the meetings regarding the impact on traffic through neighbouring villages and the insufficient capacity at the local primary school and health services in the area.

“The building would have severely detrimental consequences on the ditches and watercourses throughout this historic village.”

In 2012 – 100 years after building began on the original cement plant – the Barrington cement plant was decommissioned, having been mothballed in 2008.

At the meetings CEMEX representatives proposed that the use of the brownfield site for new homes would see £5 million invested in the village.

CEMEX community affairs manager Ian Southcott said: “We believe that the proposals represent a sustainable and beneficial use of a redundant industrial site and one that will contribute to the future development of a vibrant community.

“The addition of a pedestrian and cycle route is a big plus from a sustainability perspective, as is the significant investment in village facilities.”

The application was submitted to South Cambridgeshire District Council in October and the consultation finishes at the end of the year.


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