New help point phone and closed-circuit television cameras for Royston police station

ROYSTON police station is to get a new help point telephone and security cameras in a bid to thwart vandals. Hertfordshire Police say they are installing the new robust push button phone to help keep the lines of contact open at all times. Cameras will

ROYSTON police station is to get a new help point telephone and security cameras in a bid to thwart vandals.

Hertfordshire Police say they are installing the new "robust" push button phone to help keep the lines of contact open at all times. Cameras will also be involved to cover the entrance area.

The upgrades are part of programme of improvements to police stations being rolled out across the county, and will take place in the coming weeks.

A police spokesman said: "Unfortunately, some of these outside phones are vulnerable to vandalism, which can put them out of action for up to 24 hours while they are fixed, so a programme of works is underway to install or upgrade existing CCTV and new telephones across the county."


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With the front counter at the station now only open part time, four days a week, the phone is the only way for members of the public to contact officers.

In April, the handset at the station was vandalised, causing district councillor F John Smith to write to the Frank Whiteley, Chief Constable of Hertfordshire, to highlight the problems faced by people in Royston who want to get in touch with police.

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Hertfordshire's Assistant Chief Constable Chris Miller said: "We want to make access to police services as easy as possible for everyone - travelling to a police station is just one way to contact us and, while it is not the most popular, we want to make sure it is reliable and efficient."

Meanwhile, the station is currently clad with scaffolding as routine maintenance work is carried out.

Royston's neighbourhood sergeant Jon Vine said: "The exterior of Royston police station is currently undergoing general maintenance work.

"The last work of this nature took place in the early 1990s and this is to ensure that no major problems with the building arise in the future.

"Work is expected to take up to two weeks to complete.

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