Melbourn mum gives school assembly talk on daughter's health condition

PUBLISHED: 07:04 13 June 2019

Amanda Free speaks to pupils of Melbourn Primary School about her daughter Daisy Chandler's condition, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis as all the pupils are invited to wear purple to support the charity. Picture: DANNY LOO

Amanda Free speaks to pupils of Melbourn Primary School about her daughter Daisy Chandler's condition, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis as all the pupils are invited to wear purple to support the charity. Picture: DANNY LOO

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A Melbourn 10-year-old organised for her mum to give a talk in front of her school to raise awareness of her health condition, which usually affects older people.

Amanda Free speaks to pupils of Melbourn Primary School about her daughter Daisy Chandler's condition, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis as all the pupils are invited to wear purple to support the charity. Picture: DANNY LOOAmanda Free speaks to pupils of Melbourn Primary School about her daughter Daisy Chandler's condition, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis as all the pupils are invited to wear purple to support the charity. Picture: DANNY LOO

Daisy Chandler - who is in Year 5 at Melbourn Primary School - watched mum Amanda Free stand up in an assembly to talk about juvenile idiopathic arthritis, a form of arthritis that affects children, for an awareness day on Friday.

Daisy, who was first diagnosed with the condition aged 18 months, organised the talk with the help of mum and school headteacher Stephanie Wilcox - and pupils were asked to wear purple and make a donation to the National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society.

Mum Amanda told the Crow: "It went really well all of the children were really engaged, and it got the message across that this condition, which usually affects older people does affect one of their fellow pupils at the school as well.

Amanda Free speaks to pupils of Melbourn Primary School about her daughter Daisy Chandler's condition, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis as all the pupils are invited to wear purple to support the charity. Picture: DANNY LOOAmanda Free speaks to pupils of Melbourn Primary School about her daughter Daisy Chandler's condition, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis as all the pupils are invited to wear purple to support the charity. Picture: DANNY LOO

"It was a big shock when Daisy was diagnosed. When she was one we went camping and she tripped over, and her leg swelled up like it had been broken. It took doctors six months to diagnose her with JIA - it was a surprise when we found out because she was so young.

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"It affects her in her right ankle, and when we went to the doctors after a recent flare up they found it was in her jaw as well.

Amanda Free speaks to pupils of Melbourn Primary School about her daughter Daisy Chandler's condition, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis as all the pupils are invited to wear purple to support the charity. Picture: DANNY LOOAmanda Free speaks to pupils of Melbourn Primary School about her daughter Daisy Chandler's condition, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis as all the pupils are invited to wear purple to support the charity. Picture: DANNY LOO

"Daisy is very strong willed - she doesn't let anything phase her or let it get her down. She is very good at taking her medication, and she has grown up with the condition, so it's what she knows."

At the assembly, mum Amanda was supported by Daisy and her sister Rosie - her partner Darren thought she was "mad" for standing up in front of the school, but was also very supportive.

Daisy said: "My JIA affects me by causing me pain when walking so days out can be very painful.

Amanda Free speaks to pupils of Melbourn Primary School about her daughter Daisy Chandler's condition, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis as all the pupils are invited to wear purple to support the charity. Picture: DANNY LOOAmanda Free speaks to pupils of Melbourn Primary School about her daughter Daisy Chandler's condition, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis as all the pupils are invited to wear purple to support the charity. Picture: DANNY LOO

"I have to take a few different medicines and one makes me feel sick. I have to have that as an injection every Friday.

"My mummy did well talking to the school for me, I wanted to raise the money because it will help children have special days out and holidays with nurses who can give the medicines to them. Most children need the parents help with the medicine, so miss out on school trips away. This made me feel sad and I wanted to raise money to help them."

For more on the charity, go to www.jia.org.uk.

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