Medics make a difference

PUBLISHED: 11:56 07 February 2008 | UPDATED: 15:39 11 May 2010

WILL GOUGH gives a patient a dental examination.

WILL GOUGH gives a patient a dental examination.

A TEAM led by a ­Royston GP has returned from a mission to help poverty stricken villagers in north-west India. Dr Peter Gough is back at his surgeries in Barley and Royston after a successful trip. Dr Gough, who held medical and dental surgeries in Kha

KEEPING CHECK: Peter and Will Gough discuss a chest x-ray.

A TEAM led by a ­Royston GP has returned from a mission to help poverty stricken villagers in north-west India.

Dr Peter Gough is back at his surgeries in Barley and Royston after a "successful" trip.

Dr Gough, who held medical and dental surgeries in Khandel and Sinodia covering 25 villages which are aided by Khandel-light, the charity he set up in 2000, said: "We went there not knowing whether the people would want our services.

"In the end we could have gone on forever.

JAMES GOUGH with a patient in Sinodia.

"We had on-going queues for both medical and dental camps."

His eldest son, Captain Will Gough, and fellow Army ­dentist Capt Seb Burn saw 120 patients in the open air.

They extracted 20 teeth and after seeing that there was a problem with fluorosis - too much fluoride in the water, creating weak teeth - bought a box of toothbrushes and toothpaste and taught the local health workers how to brush teeth correctly.

Dr Gough, along with his other son James, a final year medical student at Cardiff University, saw a further 90 patients.

THE MEDICAL?TEAM: Will Gough, Seb Burn, James Gough, and Peter Gough.

"To provide the health camps with two of my sons was mind-blowing, a tremendous experience and a ­privilege," said Dr Gough.

The four-man team took antibiotics, anti-inflammatories, and painkillers with them, but had to visit the local pharmacy for more.

Dr Gough said: "Drugs are very expensive.

"One old lady was receiving treatment for a condition. She spent all her money on medication - so much money that she was not eating."

The most difficult problem the team encountered was the language barrier, and on its next visit plan to take a Hindi-speaking dental nurse and a physiotherapist.

Dr Gough now wants to establish a medical centre in Khandel where minor dentistry can be carried out, and records and drugs kept.

Although the project would need a significant donation, it would enable British and Indian doctors and dentists to visit and provide primary care and continuity for the ­communities, he said.


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