Local man’s London protest

PUBLISHED: 14:41 27 October 2010

Terry Hutt campaigning against cuts outside the Houses of Parliament

Terry Hutt campaigning against cuts outside the Houses of Parliament

Archant

A PENSIONER from Whaddon led the protests at spending cuts in London last week.

Terry Hutt, a 75 year old campaigner and member of the National Pensioners Convention (NPC), stood on College Green outside the Houses of Parliament with banners as part of concerns over benefit cuts, travel cuts and library closures, as well as wider issues such as tuition fees and forces cuts.

He also gave interviews to TV crews from around the world, and the Daily Mirror featured a picture of him with a sign reading ‘don’t cut from the poorest in the budget.’

Mr Hutt said: “I went round the tents of the TV crews and gave them a list of things we were protesting about.

“As soon as they saw me with my boards up, they loved them. Crews from France, China and Australia wanted to speak to me, as well as London radio stations and local television.

“I gave them all interviews via translators about what we were protesting about.”

Other boards held up by Mr Hutt read ‘we are all in this together, are we?’ and ‘which MPs are trustworthy.’

Later in the day he was invited into the House of Commons by Labour MP John McDonnell to watch speeches, and even managed to speak directly to a Tory minister.

“I looked a Tory minister straight in the eye and said, ‘are you going to address my hit list,’ and he said he would, so I await a response,” he said.

Mr Hutt is angry over the “outrageous” cuts, and claims that poor people will struggle to cope. “You get people who are well off, who it’s not going to affect, but it will affect the poor.

“People are going to lose jobs, and lose mortgages. And if they lose their homes then families could split up. This is not what we want to see.”

Meanwhile, on Saturday, Mr Hutt protested at the potential loss of almost 6,000 firefighter jobs throughout the country.

He travelled to Euston railway station in North London to meet with union officials, including TFL union leader Bob Crow, and gave interviews to local news.

“The media wanted to know why I was there again, as the same people saw me at the protests the week before.

“I told them it was because firefighters are my heroes, and they saved many people in the area of London where I grew up during the Blitz,” said Mr Hutt.


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