Jobs going as new way of police management introduced in Hertfordshire

PUBLISHED: 07:27 02 April 2010 | UPDATED: 16:18 11 May 2010

A NEW policing structure with the aim of further improving the service Hertfordshire Constabulary provides in an increasingly challenging financial climate has been launched.

The changes introduce one local policing command that replaces the previous thr

A NEW policing structure with the aim of further improving the service Hertfordshire Constabulary provides in an increasingly challenging financial climate has been launched.

The changes introduce one local policing command that replaces the previous three area commands, reducing duplication and complexity in how frontline officers and staff are managed and supported.

One consequence is that jobs will be lost.

The Constabulary says it remains fully committed to continuing to deliver a high class service to the community of Hertfordshire and especially victims of crime. The structure of local policing including safer neighbourhood policing has not changed.

Chief Constable Frank Whiteley explained: "We have consistently proven to be a well-performing force, borne out by a recent Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC) inspection which rated us in fourth place out of the 43 forces in England and Wales.

"However, the financial situation which the Constabulary faces over the next two to three years means we must take steps now to radically review the way we operate. We need to look for opportunities to deliver policing services even more efficiently and effectively and these changes, along with a raft of other measures such as increased collaboration with Bedfordshire and other forces, form part of this radical review."

He added: "Our focus on frontline services and our commitment to neighbourhood policing remain a priority, as does the need to remove duplication and complexity in how we manage the support we provide to officers and staff in these key roles.

"To a large extent, the public should see no significant change in the neighbourhood and response policing service they receive - the emphasis is on delivering that service in a more efficient manner."

On the jobs front, Mr Whiteley said: "Some difficult decisions have had to be made as this new policing structure has been put in place, involving some inevitable redeployment of staff involved.

"We are proud of and committed to our workforce and have taken the greatest of care to consult with those staff affected, with full co-operation from staff associations, to ensure that processes are managed fairly and equitably."

A police spokesman said: "Changes are being phased in. About 100 staff are affected but we are trying to minimise redundancies."

Some people could take early retirement and some could be redeployed.

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