High speed car chase drink driver jailed

PUBLISHED: 16:52 21 August 2009 | UPDATED: 16:06 11 May 2010

DRUNKEN driver Shaun Plumb reached speeds of 124 mph - possibly higher - when police pursued his R-registration Vauxhall Vectra, a court heard today (Friday). A judge said it was something of a miracle that there was no serious accident . Judge Andrew Br

DRUNKEN driver Shaun Plumb reached speeds of 124 mph - possibly higher - when police pursued his R-registration Vauxhall Vectra, a court heard today (Friday).

A judge said it was "something of a miracle that there was no serious accident".

Judge Andrew Bright QC also criticised the maximum sentence for dangerous driving of two years.

He said: "The maximum sentence is far too low and the sooner Parliament recognises that and does something about it, the better.

"This was one of the most serious cases of dangerous driving that one could imagine."

Plumb, 39, from Bramley Avenue, Melbourn pleaded guilty to dangerous driving, failing to stop, driving with excess alcohol and without insurance. He was jailed for 15 months at Luton Crown Court and banned from driving for three years.

The judge said he had to reduce the sentence because Plumb had pleaded guilty at an early stage.

Geoffrey Porter, prosecuting, said the pursuit began at about 9.30pm on May 3 on the Wymondley bypass.

It went from there, on to the A1(M) for one junction, along the A505 Baldock bypass and on to the Old North Road and through residential streets in Royston.

In Field Crescent, Plumb jumped from the car while it was still moving. A breath test showed he had almost twice the legal limit of alcohol in his system.

Mr Porter said the journey involved many dangerous manoeuvres. On the A505 police estimated his average speed to be 124 mph and said it could have been as high as 132 mph.

Coming up to a roundabout he was still travelling at 120 mph and lost control and hit the kerb damaging the wheel. He stopped but then carried on still at high speed. In Royston he mounted the pavement in some residential roads.

Andrew Rose, defending, said: "There is no dispute that the driving was appalling and he is shamed and remorseful."

He said Plumb suffered from schizophrenia but had not taken his medication at the time. An incident before the chase began, where he believed he had seen a shotgun coming from a car, had preyed on his mind and made him paranoid.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Royston Crow

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists