The king is dead, long live the king

PUBLISHED: 11:33 19 January 2006 | UPDATED: 17:11 11 May 2010

The proclomation of a new king

The proclomation of a new king

TOMORROW (Friday) will see the 70th anniversary of the death of George V. As the late Fred Sillence says in his book, 20th Century Royston, people were prepared for the announcement when Stuart Hibbert was saying in solemn terms on BBC radio: The King's

TOMORROW (Friday) will see the 70th anniversary of the death of George V. As the late Fred Sillence says in his book, 20th Century Royston, people were prepared for the announcement when Stuart Hibbert was saying in solemn terms on BBC radio: "The King's life is drawing to a close." Later the announcement came of George V's death. The proclamation of a new King - Edward VIII - was made in the Market Hill in Royston on January 25, 1936 by the then chairman of the Royston Urban District Council, Col E C M Phillips. Edward VIII was no stranger to Royston as he had opened the children's ward at the Royston and District Hospital some eight years earlier. But that event was kept out of the public's eye as the actual opening took place behind the hospital and only selected ticket-holders were allowed to the ceremony. It was not known then, obviously, that the boyish 34-year-old Edward VIII was to become involved in one of the most controversial royal events in history when he decided to abdicate. Meanwhile, during the week of George V's deaths all churches around the area held memorial services.

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